There is so much to love about the holidays, but not surprisingly here at Sculpta Lights, where our lighting designs and decorative light fixtures are inspired by contemporary sculptures and reflect cultural elements from around the globe, we are definitely partial to the glowing possibilities inherent in every single strand of holiday lights!

Can you blame us? Seriously, who doesn’t smile when the lights are plugged in on the tree? But there’s no reason to limit the use of those lovely – and affordable little lights – to the tree. Holiday lights – or fairy lights as they are now also called – can be used throughout your home during the holidays and all year long.

Lighting Design Projects with Holiday Lights

You can use the holiday lights you pick up at corner drugstore, the big box store or the home store to make a stylish and unique centerpiece for your holiday entertaining – whether the holiday you’re celebrating happens to be Christmas, Hanukah or the Fourth of July!  Just fill various glass containers with small strings of battery-operated lights. Get creative – you might have some mason jars or leftover jars from spaghetti sauce in your cupboard that would look lovely paired with a favorite vase or head to the thrift store and see what fun shapes you can find. You can also run fairy lights down the center of the table, like a runner.

The folks at Country Living rounded up some other fun DIY ideas for decorating with lights that have been freed from the tree, including:

DIY Flameless Fire Pit

Don’t have a fireplace? Add extra “warmth” to your living space by creating this adorable faux fire pit. (Roasted marshmallows not included.)

Get the tutorial at Free People

Winter Sparkle Mirror Garland & White Lights

Winter skies can get a bit dreary, so why not brighten up your rooms with some shimmer and sparkle? String together multiple strands of Christmas lights and mirror garland on a large hanging rod for a dangling decoration that endlessly glimmers.

Get the tutorial at Apartment Therapy.

For more year round interior lighting ideas as well as designer exterior lighting concepts, contact the lighting designers at Sculpta Lights.

There are two wonderful ways to brighten up a room that might feel a bit blah, whether it’s a living room, kitchen, dining room, bedroom or bath – lighting and color. Interior lighting and color can both make a statement, add focus and infuse a space with personality.

One of the most interesting colors to emerge as a popular choice in interior design has been Millennial Pink. “Millennial Pink can seem like a daunting color to incorporate in to your home but using just the right amount or pairing it with some smart color options can really let it do its thing and make a room shine,” says HouseTipster.

If you search for images of Millennial Pink, chances are you’ll see pictures of a variety of different shades of pink. “The tricky thing about Millennial Pink is that it’s also notoriously difficult to identify. While it appears some bloggers, designers, and color enthusiasts use the name Millennial Pink as a sort of catch-all for anything that roughly falls between bubblegum pink to rose quartz, Millennial Pink is its own entity, hard to classify as it may be.”

Millennial Pink Lighting

Perhaps the most intriguing thing about Millennial Pink is that it is a neutral. So, if you’re thinking it might be something Barbie would wear, think again! Millennial Pink is a sophisticated shade of pink. In searching for a definition, Shutterstock says terms like “peachy-salmon, rose gold, rose quartz, pale dogwood” can all be considered correct.

“Millennial Pink can seem like a daunting color to incorporate in to your home,” the pros at HomeTipster admit, but don’t let that stop you. The key to decorating with Millennial Pink, they say, is “using just the right amount or pairing it with some smart color options can really let it do its thing and make a room shine.”

If you want to use rose-gold contemporary light fixtures as a way to introduce Millennial Pink into your home décor, we can help.  A number of our decorative light fixtures are available with a rose gold finish that will add a subtle yet undeniably sophisticated touch. Just call us at 800-403-1790.

In the Spotlight: Our Veterans
At Sculpta Lights, our specialty is contemporary lighting, but that doesn’t mean we don’t have a true appreciation for history – especially when it comes to the brave men and women who have served our nation. So, as Veterans Day approaches, we’d like to turn the glow of our designer home lighting on an important chapter in our nation’s history.

The History of Veterans Day
World War I still ranks as one of the deadliest conflicts in history. Prior to the rise of Adolph Hitler, it was referred to as the war to end all wars or simply as The Great War. By the time the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles, France, more than 18 million had died. Another 23 million were wounded.

If you remember reading “All Quiet on the Western Front” or any of the other books detailing the horrid conditions endured by the soldiers during World War I, you might just begin to understand the profound relief associated with the end of the fighting. Even fans of “Downtown Abbey” might have gotten a hint of the horrors of the war.

A treaty ceremony securing the peace took place on June 28, 1919, about seven months after an armistice had brought an end to the fighting between Germany and the Allied nations. The armistice went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month.

Almost 100 years later, we still pause to remember those who serve on November 11.

It’s Not that Kind of Holiday
In 1968, Congress signed the Uniform Holiday Bill. The idea was to ensure that a few federal holidays — Veterans Day included — would be celebrated on a Monday. According to U.S. Department of Defense, “Officials hoped it would spur travel and other family activities over a long weekend, which would stimulate the economy.”

Turns out, we care about our veterans more than we do our three-day weekends. “Within a few years, it became pretty apparent that most U.S. citizens wanted to celebrate Veterans Day on Nov. 11, since it was a matter of historic and patriotic significance. So on Sept. 20, 1975, President Gerald Ford signed another law (Public Law 94-97), which returned the annual observance to its original date starting in 1978,” the Dept. of Defense explains.

All of us at Sculpta Lights would like to thank our veterans for their service. We manufacture contemporary light fixtures inspired by art work and design elements from around the world and we know that without those willing to fight for our freedoms, our designer home lighting would never shine.

You’ll Need More Interior Lighting: Daylight Saving Time Ends Sunday, Nov. 3

If you’ve been wanting to update your interiors with stylish contemporary lighting, you couldn’t pick a better time than Sunday, Nov. 3, which marks the end of Daylight Saving Time. As we set the clocks back an hour, you’ll be relying even more on interior lighting to banish the darkness and fill your home with light and warmth.

Sculpta Lights, your source for designer home lighting for every room of your home, offers an exciting selection of contemporary chandeliers, table lamps, floor lamps and pendant lights.

A Nation Divided

As we get ready to bid Daylight Saving Time farewell for another year, once again, the nation is divided. Every year as the first Sunday in November approaches, some people will be happily looking forward to gaining an extra hour of sleep, while others will be bemoaning what they perceive as the impending loss of daylight hours.

According to Live Science, “Daylight saving time has a rocky past. Established in the United States in 1918, daylight saving time was a contentious matter and was repealed in 1919. The standardized clock changes, however, were re-established nationally early in World War II and observed from Feb. 9, 1942 through Sept. 30, 1945.”

Live Science goes on to say that, “After the war, U.S. states were free to choose whether to observe daylight saving time, and if they did, the calendar start dates of the time change. The result was time confusion for travelers and newscasters. In 1966, Congress enacted the Uniform Time Act, which stated that if any state observed daylight saving time, it had to follow a uniform protocol, beginning and ending on the same dates throughout the country.”

Which brings us to today. The folks who would prefer that Daylight Saving Time remain in effect permanently may be louder, but according to polls, they are in the minority.

On the Bright Side

Even while Daylight Saving Time still reigns, you may have noticed the fading light as you make your way home from work. With every day, we are moving closer and closer to the winter equinox, the shortest day of the year.  This year, the winter equinox falls on Saturday, Dec. 21.

In other words, you were going to be turning on the lights earlier anyway. Having beautiful contemporary lighting from Sculpta Lights will help you keep the darkness at bay.  Shop our full collection of designer home lighting now.