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It never sounded like much, but now we all know how long 20 seconds really is. While you’re standing there singing Happy Birthday – or whatever song you have settled on – a couple of times, you’ve probably had plenty of time to think about what’s for dinner or which Zoom background you want to use for the next meeting. (If you took the opportunity to look at your bath lighting, and have decided it’s time for some more contemporary light fixtures, just let us know!) 

Some of the folks here at Sculpta Designer Lighting, had some questions about handwashing so we’ve been doing a little research. We figure if we had questions, you might, too, so we thought we’d share what we learned. 

What’s better – soap or hand sanitizer? 

The CDC (Centers for Disease Control) say that if you have a choice, go with soap and water, which reduces the amounts of all types of germs and chemicals that might be on your hands. And, of course, wash for 20 seconds. “But if soap and water are not available, using a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol can help you avoid getting sick and spreading germs to others,” the say. 

The downside to sanitizers is that they don’t eliminate all types of germs. “Soap and water are more effective than hand sanitizers at removing certain kinds of germs, like Cryptosporidiumnorovirus, and Clostridium difficile,” the CDC experts explain. “Although alcohol-based hand sanitizers can inactivate many types of microbes very effectively when used correctly1-15, people may not use a large enough volume of the sanitizers or may wipe it off before it has dried 14.”

Which leads to the next question…

How long should I take when washing my hands with sanitizer? 

This one is easy – until they are dry.

 

Of course, we’re not scientists or medical professionals, we are experts in lighting design and contemporary light fixtures, so always check with your doctor if you have questions.

Talk about an innovative mind! Thomas Alva Edison received almost 1,100 patents in his lifetime. Of course, here at Sculpta Designer Lights, we are most impressed – and grateful – for his many inventions and advancements regarding electricity and electric lights.

Edison wasn’t the only one trying to invent a safe and affordable form of electric light. Various scientists had been scratching their heads over the challenge for decades. In 1880, when Edison had his big breakthrough, contemporary lighting was gaslight. 

Edison – Beyond Lightbulbs and Light Fixtures

As the U.S. Department of Energy reports, “Edison left a profound impact on the nation’s energy sector. Beyond inventing a light bulb that was both practical and inexpensive, he devised a whole system of electric lighting — including electricity generators, wires to get electricity from the power station to homes and light fixtures (lamps, sockets and switches).”

Edison also invented the phonograph and one of the earliest moving picture cameras. Also of ongoing interest was the battery he designed for use in electric cars.

“Back when the automobile was first introduced, electric cars outsold their internal combustion counterparts. Still, the lead-acid batteries that powered these vehicles featured several limitations: not only were they very heavy, acid from the battery would corrode the car’s interior,” the Department of Energy says. “Edison was among the first scientists focused on developing a better alternative.”

Edison struggled with the challenge, but did develop a battery, albeit one that had some issues. “Edison’s batteries were plagued by many shortcomings and were eventually outpaced in the automobile market by the arrival of Henry Ford’s Model T,” the D.O.E. says. “Although it failed to live up to automotive expectations, the Edison battery proved to be a profitable invention and paved the way for the modern alkaline battery.”

With his inventive mind, we like to think that Edison would have approved of the contemporary light fixtures we specialize in here at Sculpta Designer Lighting.

Decorative lighting can complement the décor of an interior space, perhaps even providing a distinctive focal point, while also serving a very practical function. That’s especially true here at Sculpta Lights, where many of our interior lighting designs are inspired by contemporary sculptures.

From contemporary chandeliers, like our Sputnik Contemporary Chandelier from Waverly, to designer lighting like our 46-inch LED Pendant Light from Pavi, or our https://sculptalights.com/shop/bedroom/63-inch Floor Lamp from Apex with its mod vibe, the modern interior lighting options we offer make a real statement.

Contemporary Sculpture Trends

Of course, when we talk about the sculptural influences on our designer home lighting fixtures, we are referring to styles like minimalism, pop and modernism. It would be hard to imagine how some of the Remarkable Recent Sculptures showcased by the editors at Artspace could inspire decorative lighting.

For example, MARCELO CIDADE’s Imóvel, 2004, which features 61 concrete breezeblocks stacked in a grocery store cart, made the list.  “As well as borrowing from the language of Minimalism, the sculpture evokes the Modernist tower blocks in the artist’s home city of São Paulo,” the editors at Artspace say. “As the work’s title suggests, the [grocery cart] has been rendered useless, made immobile (imóvel) by the sheer weight bearing down on it. Concrete is a recurring material in the young Brazilian artist’s work, alluding to the wave of utopian Modernist architecture that promised to transform so many Latin American cities, yet arguably failed to deliver.”

The work is compelling, but it might not translate well into contemporary lighting design.

The same could be said for JOANA VASCONCELOSLilicoptère, 2012. “For this sculpture, Vasconcelos adorned a Bell 47 helicopter with ostrich feathers and thousands of rhinestones. Its lavish interior is further bedecked with intricate woodwork, sumptuous gilding, and embroidered upholstery,” Artspace says. “Inspired by the opulent surroundings of the Palace of Versailles, France, where it was first exhibited, Vasconcelos’s work draws on the grand aesthetics of the Ancien Régime, speculating the type of motorized vehicle that Marie Antoinette might enjoy were she alive today. Such extravagant and witty projects are typical of the Lisbon-based artist, who de-contextualizes and subverts commonplace objects, investing them with new meanings.”

You may not have room in your home for a feather-bedecked helicopter, but you will find an extensive selection of contemporary light fixtures that will add an artistic flair to any interior here at Sculpta Lights.

You may have been too busy celebrating the holidays to pay much attention to the Winter Solstice when it rolled around on December 21. But you were probably marking the occasion even if you weren’t aware of it simply by relying much more heavily on your interior lighting.

Depending on where you live, you might be turning on not just your favorite reading lamp but all of your contemporary light fixtures at what seems to be an unreasonably early hour in the afternoon. In the summertime, you might not even use some of those fabulous lighting fixtures, aside from your bath lighting, on a regular basis.  But you have to pay a little more attention to your interior lighting on these long winter nights.

The Longest Night of the Year

The Winter Solstice is the shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere. As the experts at Time and Date explain, “December Solstice occurs when the Sun reaches its most southerly declination of -23.4 degrees. In other words, when the North Pole is tilted furthest away from the Sun.”

But if you think you’ve got it bad, needing to turn on the lighting in and around your home halfway through the afternoon, think about the poor people living north of you. “North of the Arctic Circle towards the North Pole there is no direct sunlight at all during this time of the year,” Time and Date says.

With the enhanced need for interior lighting, it’s not unusual for people to pay more attention to the light fixtures in their home. Some may notice that the lighting design doesn’t banish all the shadows. Others may just notice that it really is time to hang a more contemporary chandelier in the dining room!

If you fall into either category, contact the designer home lighting experts at Sculpta Lights!

Thomas Edison will never be forgotten and his incandescent lightbulb will always stand as a testament to human ingenuity, but contemporary light fixtures and lighting design allow for the use of different kinds of lightbulbs.

“The incandescent light bulb has been around since the late 1800s, but the venerable technology’s dominance seems just about over,” National Geographic reported. “On January 1, 2014, in keeping with a law passed by Congress in 2007, the old familiar tungsten-filament 40- and 60-watt incandescent light bulbs can no longer be manufactured in the U.S., because they don’t meet federal energy-efficiency standards.”

The Next Generation in Lighting

If you need to change the lightbulb in today’s contemporary light fixtures – from bath lighting to designer exterior lighting and contemporary chandeliers – you will be using a CFL lightbulb or, perhaps, an LED bulb. With either, you won’t need to change them nearly as often as you did their incandescent precursors.

“By the late 1920s and early 1930s, European researchers were doing experiments with neon tubes coated with phosphors (a material that absorbs ultraviolet light and converts the invisible light into useful white light). These findings sparked fluorescent lamp research programs in the U.S., and by the mid and late 1930s, American lighting companies were demonstrating fluorescent lights to the U.S. Navy and at the 1939 New York World’s Fair,” the Department of Energy says. “These lights lasted longer and were about three times more efficient than incandescent bulbs. The need for energy-efficient lighting American war plants led to the rapid adoption of fluorescents, and by 1951, more light in the U.S. was being produced by linear fluorescent lamps.”

The need for energy conservation continued to drive innovation. “It was another energy shortage — the 1973 oil crisis — that caused lighting engineers to develop a fluorescent bulb that could be used in residential applications,” the Department of Energy says.

In the 1970s, Edward Hammer at General Electric created the first compact fluorescent light (CFL) by bending the fluorescent tube into a spiral shape. While they were more energy efficient, until fairly recently, the price of CFLs was a deterrent to their use. Now, according to the Department of Energy, “Nearly 30 years after CFLs were first introduced on the market, an ENERGY STAR® CFL costs as little as $1.74 per bulb when purchased in a four-pack.”

For more information on fluorescent lighting and other options in designer home lighting, feel free to contact your friends at Sculpta Contemporary Lighting.

There are two wonderful ways to brighten up a room that might feel a bit blah, whether it’s a living room, kitchen, dining room, bedroom or bath – lighting and color. Interior lighting and color can both make a statement, add focus and infuse a space with personality.

One of the most interesting colors to emerge as a popular choice in interior design has been Millennial Pink. “Millennial Pink can seem like a daunting color to incorporate in to your home but using just the right amount or pairing it with some smart color options can really let it do its thing and make a room shine,” says HouseTipster.

If you search for images of Millennial Pink, chances are you’ll see pictures of a variety of different shades of pink. “The tricky thing about Millennial Pink is that it’s also notoriously difficult to identify. While it appears some bloggers, designers, and color enthusiasts use the name Millennial Pink as a sort of catch-all for anything that roughly falls between bubblegum pink to rose quartz, Millennial Pink is its own entity, hard to classify as it may be.”

Millennial Pink Lighting

Perhaps the most intriguing thing about Millennial Pink is that it is a neutral. So, if you’re thinking it might be something Barbie would wear, think again! Millennial Pink is a sophisticated shade of pink. In searching for a definition, Shutterstock says terms like “peachy-salmon, rose gold, rose quartz, pale dogwood” can all be considered correct.

“Millennial Pink can seem like a daunting color to incorporate in to your home,” the pros at HomeTipster admit, but don’t let that stop you. The key to decorating with Millennial Pink, they say, is “using just the right amount or pairing it with some smart color options can really let it do its thing and make a room shine.”

If you want to use rose-gold contemporary light fixtures as a way to introduce Millennial Pink into your home décor, we can help.  A number of our decorative light fixtures are available with a rose gold finish that will add a subtle yet undeniably sophisticated touch. Just call us at 800-403-1790.