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Just because something is beautiful, it doesn’t mean it can’t be extremely practical, too. That holds true for a classic leather clutch, a colorful trench coat or a Camaro convertible and it certainly holds true for designer exterior lighting

When you are trying to make your home, office, warehouse or shop more secure, the pros will tell you that the key is to focus on deterrence. It’s kind of like that old saying about locking the barn door after the horse has bolted. 

Pretty and Practical Deterrence

According to Protect Your Home, a blog from the home security experts at ADT, illuminating your home is one of the best things you can do to keep criminals at bay. “Outdoor lights help make for an easy crime deterrent at night. While motion-sensing lights are by far the best option, simply leaving a porch light on along with the back door or side door lights works very well,” they say. 

By lighting up the exterior of your home or business, you make it a much less attractive target for burglars. 

Indoor lights can also work to help deter crime,” ADT says in its blog. “Many criminals are just after your stuff and often don’t want any confrontation. If they think you’re home, they likely won’t break in. Leaving the kitchen or living room light on will help provide the illusion that someone is home even when you’re not. TVs and radios make a good addition to indoor lights, because the sound will help further the illusion that someone is home. Turn them up loud enough to be heard but not so loud that the voices are distinct.”

You can make your home more secure – and more beautiful – with designer lighting from Sculpta Lights. We offer an array of decorative lighting styles, including floor lamps, pendant lights and contemporary chandeliers.

LED lights are the “it” contemporary lighting source these days. They provide beautiful interior lighting while providing energy savings and they last a good long time. What more could you want to bring your beautiful decorative lighting fixtures from Sculpta Lights to life?

The technology underlying LEDs was first stumbled upon in the early 1960s. Gary Pittman and Bob Biard from Texas Instruments, Nick Holonyak Jr. at General Electric, and M. George Craford, one of Holonyak’s graduate students, all played a part in the early development.

And, as the Department of Energy reports, they continue to develop in exciting ways. “One of the fastest developing lighting technologies today is the light-emitting diode (or LED). A type of solid-state lighting, LEDs use a semiconductor to convert electricity into light, are often small in area (less than 1 square millimeter) and emit light in a specific direction, reducing the need for reflectors and diffusers that can trap light,” they say.

What Are LED Lights?

 As experts with the Environmental Protection Agency’s Energy Star initiative explain, “LED stands for light emitting diode. LED lighting products produce light approximately 90% more efficiently than incandescent light bulbs. How do they work? An electrical current passes through a microchip, which illuminates the tiny light sources we call LEDs and the result is visible light.”

Benefits of LED Lighting

LED lights really are an important advancement in lighting. They are the most energy efficient bulbs available. They also open the door to a new world of opportunities, as the Energy Star website explains. “Small in size, LEDs provide unique design opportunities,” they say. “Some LED bulb solutions may physically resemble familiar light bulbs and better match the appearance of traditional light bulbs. Some LED light fixtures may have LEDs built in as a permanent light source. There are also hybrid approaches where a non-traditional ‘bulb’ or replaceable light source format is used and specially designed for a unique fixture.”

The Energy Star experts go on to say, “LEDs offer a tremendous opportunity for innovation in lighting form factors and fit a wider breadth of applications than traditional lighting technologies.”

Here at Sculpta Lights, a leader in designer lighting, we look forward to sharing those innovations with you as LED technology continues to impact trends in interior lighting in new and exciting ways .

Decorative lighting can complement the décor of an interior space, perhaps even providing a distinctive focal point, while also serving a very practical function. That’s especially true here at Sculpta Lights, where many of our interior lighting designs are inspired by contemporary sculptures.

From contemporary chandeliers, like our Sputnik Contemporary Chandelier from Waverly, to designer lighting like our 46-inch LED Pendant Light from Pavi, or our https://sculptalights.com/shop/bedroom/63-inch Floor Lamp from Apex with its mod vibe, the modern interior lighting options we offer make a real statement.

Contemporary Sculpture Trends

Of course, when we talk about the sculptural influences on our designer home lighting fixtures, we are referring to styles like minimalism, pop and modernism. It would be hard to imagine how some of the Remarkable Recent Sculptures showcased by the editors at Artspace could inspire decorative lighting.

For example, MARCELO CIDADE’s Imóvel, 2004, which features 61 concrete breezeblocks stacked in a grocery store cart, made the list.  “As well as borrowing from the language of Minimalism, the sculpture evokes the Modernist tower blocks in the artist’s home city of São Paulo,” the editors at Artspace say. “As the work’s title suggests, the [grocery cart] has been rendered useless, made immobile (imóvel) by the sheer weight bearing down on it. Concrete is a recurring material in the young Brazilian artist’s work, alluding to the wave of utopian Modernist architecture that promised to transform so many Latin American cities, yet arguably failed to deliver.”

The work is compelling, but it might not translate well into contemporary lighting design.

The same could be said for JOANA VASCONCELOSLilicoptère, 2012. “For this sculpture, Vasconcelos adorned a Bell 47 helicopter with ostrich feathers and thousands of rhinestones. Its lavish interior is further bedecked with intricate woodwork, sumptuous gilding, and embroidered upholstery,” Artspace says. “Inspired by the opulent surroundings of the Palace of Versailles, France, where it was first exhibited, Vasconcelos’s work draws on the grand aesthetics of the Ancien Régime, speculating the type of motorized vehicle that Marie Antoinette might enjoy were she alive today. Such extravagant and witty projects are typical of the Lisbon-based artist, who de-contextualizes and subverts commonplace objects, investing them with new meanings.”

You may not have room in your home for a feather-bedecked helicopter, but you will find an extensive selection of contemporary light fixtures that will add an artistic flair to any interior here at Sculpta Lights.

Sure, sliced bread was a wonderful innovation but, more than 150 years after it was invented, it is the image of a lightbulb that still stands as a symbol of a great new idea. It is hard to overstate the impact that electric light had on society. It is not an exaggeration to say that the incandescent lightbulb not only revolutionized interior lighting in homes and businesses across America, it revolutionized society.

The lightbulb – something that most of us take for granted – changed the way we work; the way we cook and heat our homes; the way we design buildings; the way we are entertained and so much more. It changed the way we live!

The Early History of the Lightbulb

Edison was a giant in the field of electric light, but he wasn’t the only one working to bring a lightbulb to market. “Thomas EdisonGeorge Westinghouse, and other inventors began introducing practical electric power systems in the 1880s,” The Smithsonian National Museum of American History points out.

Expanding on that idea, the Department of Energy says, “Like all great inventions, the light bulb can’t be credited to one inventor It was a series of small improvements on the ideas of previous inventors that have led to the light bulbs we use in our homes today.”

The experts at Department of Energy go on to say, “Long before Thomas Edison patented — first in 1879 and then a year later in 1880 — and began commercializing his incandescent light bulb, British inventors were demonstrating that electric light was possible with the arc lamp. In 1835, the first constant electric light was demonstrated, and for the next 40 years, scientists around the world worked on the incandescent lamp, tinkering with the filament (the part of the bulb that produces light when heated by an electrical current) and the bulb’s atmosphere (whether air is vacuumed out of the bulb or it is filled with an inert gas to prevent the filament from oxidizing and burning out). These early bulbs had extremely short lifespans, were too expensive to produce or used too much energy.”

He was one of the greatest inventors this country has ever seen, but not even Thomas Edison could have foreseen the way his simple incandescent lightbulb would someday evolve into the kind of contemporary chandeliers, decorative lighting and designer exterior lighting that we are known for here at Sculpta Lights.  You could say this particular history lesson is electrifying!

For most people in the United States, any discussion of interior lighting is in effect a discussion about decorative lighting or at the very least it’s a discussion of lighting design. Of course, that wasn’t always the case.

One hundred years ago, much of the country was still in the dark. In fact, in 1925 – less than 100 years ago – only half the homes in this country had electricity, according to the National Park Service, which runs the Thomas Edison National Historical Park in New Jersey.

Electrifying the Country

There was no power grid to plug into when Thomas Edison invented the lightbulb back in the 1870s. Edison used generators to power the interior lighting he had installed in very limited locations. Edison might have been a genius when it came to his innovation inventions, but he was a lousy businessman. It was his young assistant, an Englishman with a heavy Cockney accent named Samuel Insull, who provided the business acumen needed to lay the foundation for a profitable system of delivering electricity to American homes.

“On September 4, 1882, Edison Electric Illuminating Company of New York opened a power plant on Pearl Street in Manhattan. Six coal-fired dynamos, each weighing 27 tons, made the steam that powered a grid a mile square,” HistoryNet tells us. “Insull had been integral to persuading city officials, sometimes with bribes, to approve the project, which needed to bury 100,000 feet of wire.”

The Pearl Street Station was the beginning of a massive transformation. Soon a tapestry of privately owned municipal utility companies blanketed the country. By the 1920s, the lights were going on in most of the nation’s cities and towns from coast to coast, but American’s rural communities lagged far behind.

“Running wires into the countryside where there might be only a few people per square mile seemed uneconomical for either investors or tax-payers,” the Smithsonian Museum of American History reports. “By 1932 only about 10% of rural America was electrified, and about half of those people had to buy their own country-home power plants. This electrical divide fueled the difference in standards of living between city and farm, hampering rural Americans’ ability to participate in the life of their modernizing country.”

The Smithsonian Museum of American History says, “World War II interrupted the work of the REA [Rural Electrification Administration]. When President Roosevelt signed the Rural Electrification Bill in September 1944, Roosevelt said, ‘From the point of view of raising the living standards of rural America and providing a more efficient form of farm management, one of the most important projects interrupted by the war is the extension of rural electrification.’”

It wasn’t until the war was over that the electrification of the country was completed. So you see it is only relatively recently that people have developed an interest in decorative lighting. For most of the 20th century, the most important aspect of interior lighting was simply getting the lights turned on!