Posts

Just because something is beautiful, it doesn’t mean it can’t be extremely practical, too. That holds true for a classic leather clutch, a colorful trench coat or a Camaro convertible and it certainly holds true for designer exterior lighting

When you are trying to make your home, office, warehouse or shop more secure, the pros will tell you that the key is to focus on deterrence. It’s kind of like that old saying about locking the barn door after the horse has bolted. 

Pretty and Practical Deterrence

According to Protect Your Home, a blog from the home security experts at ADT, illuminating your home is one of the best things you can do to keep criminals at bay. “Outdoor lights help make for an easy crime deterrent at night. While motion-sensing lights are by far the best option, simply leaving a porch light on along with the back door or side door lights works very well,” they say. 

By lighting up the exterior of your home or business, you make it a much less attractive target for burglars. 

Indoor lights can also work to help deter crime,” ADT says in its blog. “Many criminals are just after your stuff and often don’t want any confrontation. If they think you’re home, they likely won’t break in. Leaving the kitchen or living room light on will help provide the illusion that someone is home even when you’re not. TVs and radios make a good addition to indoor lights, because the sound will help further the illusion that someone is home. Turn them up loud enough to be heard but not so loud that the voices are distinct.”

You can make your home more secure – and more beautiful – with designer lighting from Sculpta Lights. We offer an array of decorative lighting styles, including floor lamps, pendant lights and contemporary chandeliers.

Sculpta Designer Lighting, your source for exceptional contemporary lighting, is based in Miami, Florida. Here in the Sunshine State, we are used to welcoming tourists from all around the world. But tourists aren’t the only ones who enjoy our beaches. Every year sea turtles come to our shores to lay their eggs. 

Sea turtle nesting season is just around the corner. It begins on March 1 and will last run through the end of October. Whether you have designer exterior lighting or interior lighting that shines on the beach, during nesting season, homeowners and businesses all along the Florida coast need to take steps to keep the lights down low.  

Lighting the Way for Sea Turtles

Not all sea turtles are the same. You can find seven different species living in the world’s oceans. Florida is an important nesting ground for five of those species – all of which are threatened or endangered. 

Florida’s sea turtles include:

  • Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) The most common sea turtle in Florida, the loggerhead is named for its massive, block-like head. … threatened
  • Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas) …endangered
  • Leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) … Critically Endangered
  • Kemp’s Ridley (Lepidochelys kempi) … Critically Endangered – the rarest sea turtle
  • Hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata) Critically Endangered

 

All of our sea turtles have one thing in common: the problem of light pollution from cities, towns and private homes along the coast. 

As the Sea Turtle Conservancy explains, “Nesting turtles once had no trouble finding a quiet, dark beach on which to nest, but now they must compete with tourists, businesses and coastal residents for use of sandy beaches. U.S. beaches, popular with humans and turtles alike, are now lined with seaside condominiums, houses and hotels. Lights from these developments discourage females from nesting. If a female fails to nest after multiple false crawls, she will resort to less-than-optimal nesting spots or deposit her eggs in the ocean. In either case, the survival outlook for hatchlings is slim.

“Lighting near the shore also can cause hatchlings to become disoriented and wander inland, where they often die of dehydration or predation,” the experts at the Sea Turtle Conservancy continue. “Hatchlings, scientists believe, have an innate instinct that leads them in the brightest direction, which is normally moonlight reflecting off of the ocean. Excess lighting from the nearshore buildings and streets draw hatchlings toward land, where they may be eaten, run over, or drown swimming pools.”

Efforts are being made up and down the coast of Florida to reduce light pollution during sea turtle nesting season. If you would like more information, about steps you can take to help protect endangered sea turtles, contact the Sea Turtle Conservancy.

And if you would like information about how you can adapt your designer exterior lighting or decorative interior lighting from Sculpta Lights for the upcoming sea turtle nesting season, please contact us.

Sure, sliced bread was a wonderful innovation but, more than 150 years after it was invented, it is the image of a lightbulb that still stands as a symbol of a great new idea. It is hard to overstate the impact that electric light had on society. It is not an exaggeration to say that the incandescent lightbulb not only revolutionized interior lighting in homes and businesses across America, it revolutionized society.

The lightbulb – something that most of us take for granted – changed the way we work; the way we cook and heat our homes; the way we design buildings; the way we are entertained and so much more. It changed the way we live!

The Early History of the Lightbulb

Edison was a giant in the field of electric light, but he wasn’t the only one working to bring a lightbulb to market. “Thomas EdisonGeorge Westinghouse, and other inventors began introducing practical electric power systems in the 1880s,” The Smithsonian National Museum of American History points out.

Expanding on that idea, the Department of Energy says, “Like all great inventions, the light bulb can’t be credited to one inventor It was a series of small improvements on the ideas of previous inventors that have led to the light bulbs we use in our homes today.”

The experts at Department of Energy go on to say, “Long before Thomas Edison patented — first in 1879 and then a year later in 1880 — and began commercializing his incandescent light bulb, British inventors were demonstrating that electric light was possible with the arc lamp. In 1835, the first constant electric light was demonstrated, and for the next 40 years, scientists around the world worked on the incandescent lamp, tinkering with the filament (the part of the bulb that produces light when heated by an electrical current) and the bulb’s atmosphere (whether air is vacuumed out of the bulb or it is filled with an inert gas to prevent the filament from oxidizing and burning out). These early bulbs had extremely short lifespans, were too expensive to produce or used too much energy.”

He was one of the greatest inventors this country has ever seen, but not even Thomas Edison could have foreseen the way his simple incandescent lightbulb would someday evolve into the kind of contemporary chandeliers, decorative lighting and designer exterior lighting that we are known for here at Sculpta Lights.  You could say this particular history lesson is electrifying!