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Interior lighting is an important element of every room in your house, helping to evoke a certain ambiance while also facilitating the function of the space. When it comes to making a home office a place where you can be both productive and comfortable, the lighting design can be key.

Designer home lighting can make life not only more beautiful but also easier. For example, a contemporary chandelier in the entryway will illuminate the area when you’re looking for your keys but can also fill the space with warmth that will be appreciated when you welcome guests. The right bath lighting can make it easier to put on your makeup or get a good shave, while also helping to create a soothing haven. 

If you already have a home office or if you are converting a space in your home for use as a home office during these unprecedented times, you should take the time to determine if the existing lighting design is going to facilitate your efforts or if, perhaps, you need to make some changes. 

Home Office Lighting Design

Whether you are working from home or are simply at home trying to work, the interior lighting of your workspace can play an important role in determining how much you get done on any given day. 

As Michael Desmond of The Spruce says, “Poor lighting can reduce your energy, dampen morale, produce eyestrain and headaches, and ultimately impair your ability to work effectively.” Boom!

“If you don’t have a lot of natural light, then artificial lights are even more important when considering workspace illumination,” he says. “Many home offices have ambient lighting that includes overhead or recessed lights, but it’s a mistake to think that those will suffice. Existing ambient lighting is not designed for functional lighting in the home office, and it’s necessary to add additional sources.”

Designer home lighting can be both attractive and functional and is worth investing in for the long-term. At this moment in time, when you may need to get your home office up and running quickly, you may need to focus your interior lighting needs on the functional. If we can help in anyway, contact us.

LED has had an impact on lighting design in a number of ways. In addition to the energy efficient properties associated with the technology and the luminosity of the light itself, LED – or light-emitting diodes – can go where ordinary lightbulbs never could. Today’s high-end contemporary light fixtures reflect the incredible design possibilities that are now available thanks to LED.

Examples of Outstanding Contemporary LED Lighting

Here at Sculpta, we are proud to offer a wide selection of truly striking interior lighting options, including:

  • The Palmz 47-Inch LED Flush Mount, which reflects geometric style elements of modernism, adds an eclectic contemporary touch to your interior design. An LED light strip is at the heart of the design, ensuring good looks and long-lasting functionality.
  • Weddington LED Flush Mount also adds contemporary lighting flair with its chrome finish and modern geometric influences.
  • Oxer 30-Inch LED Table Lamp, made with metal and silicone, is an artsy lighting design piece that will make a statement wherever you plug it in. It comes with a dimmer remote control so you can set the mood with LED lighting.
  • San Bari 35-Inch LED Table Lamp, another example of creative lighting design, can reflect your artistic side. It, too, allows you to control your interior lighting with the aid of an LED dimmer remote.
  • Sakura 63-Inch LED Floor Lamp, ideal for a bedroom, living room or office, offers a choice between a warm or cool white light – another variable offered by LED technology – while adding a sculptural focal point to your space. 
  • Verse 63-Inch LED Floor Lamp, equipped with a dimmer switch, is another contemporary showstopper.
  • Wilshire 63-Inch LED Floor Lamp, which lights up a room with its distinctive style and integrated LED lighting, is contemporary lighting at its finest.
  • Xaret 47-Inch LED Pendant Lamp, with remote control dimmer, provides an instant update to your interior space. It also offers either warm or cool white light from an integrated LED light strip that will last a lifetime.

With contemporary LED light fixtures like these, you can enjoy ultimate style and exceptional functionality. And, with their integrated LED light strips, you’ll never have to worry about changing a lightbulb again!

LED lights are the “it” contemporary lighting source these days. They provide beautiful interior lighting while providing energy savings and they last a good long time. What more could you want to bring your beautiful decorative lighting fixtures from Sculpta Lights to life?

The technology underlying LEDs was first stumbled upon in the early 1960s. Gary Pittman and Bob Biard from Texas Instruments, Nick Holonyak Jr. at General Electric, and M. George Craford, one of Holonyak’s graduate students, all played a part in the early development.

And, as the Department of Energy reports, they continue to develop in exciting ways. “One of the fastest developing lighting technologies today is the light-emitting diode (or LED). A type of solid-state lighting, LEDs use a semiconductor to convert electricity into light, are often small in area (less than 1 square millimeter) and emit light in a specific direction, reducing the need for reflectors and diffusers that can trap light,” they say.

What Are LED Lights?

 As experts with the Environmental Protection Agency’s Energy Star initiative explain, “LED stands for light emitting diode. LED lighting products produce light approximately 90% more efficiently than incandescent light bulbs. How do they work? An electrical current passes through a microchip, which illuminates the tiny light sources we call LEDs and the result is visible light.”

Benefits of LED Lighting

LED lights really are an important advancement in lighting. They are the most energy efficient bulbs available. They also open the door to a new world of opportunities, as the Energy Star website explains. “Small in size, LEDs provide unique design opportunities,” they say. “Some LED bulb solutions may physically resemble familiar light bulbs and better match the appearance of traditional light bulbs. Some LED light fixtures may have LEDs built in as a permanent light source. There are also hybrid approaches where a non-traditional ‘bulb’ or replaceable light source format is used and specially designed for a unique fixture.”

The Energy Star experts go on to say, “LEDs offer a tremendous opportunity for innovation in lighting form factors and fit a wider breadth of applications than traditional lighting technologies.”

Here at Sculpta Lights, a leader in designer lighting, we look forward to sharing those innovations with you as LED technology continues to impact trends in interior lighting in new and exciting ways .

You may have been too busy celebrating the holidays to pay much attention to the Winter Solstice when it rolled around on December 21. But you were probably marking the occasion even if you weren’t aware of it simply by relying much more heavily on your interior lighting.

Depending on where you live, you might be turning on not just your favorite reading lamp but all of your contemporary light fixtures at what seems to be an unreasonably early hour in the afternoon. In the summertime, you might not even use some of those fabulous lighting fixtures, aside from your bath lighting, on a regular basis.  But you have to pay a little more attention to your interior lighting on these long winter nights.

The Longest Night of the Year

The Winter Solstice is the shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere. As the experts at Time and Date explain, “December Solstice occurs when the Sun reaches its most southerly declination of -23.4 degrees. In other words, when the North Pole is tilted furthest away from the Sun.”

But if you think you’ve got it bad, needing to turn on the lighting in and around your home halfway through the afternoon, think about the poor people living north of you. “North of the Arctic Circle towards the North Pole there is no direct sunlight at all during this time of the year,” Time and Date says.

With the enhanced need for interior lighting, it’s not unusual for people to pay more attention to the light fixtures in their home. Some may notice that the lighting design doesn’t banish all the shadows. Others may just notice that it really is time to hang a more contemporary chandelier in the dining room!

If you fall into either category, contact the designer home lighting experts at Sculpta Lights!

Thomas Edison will never be forgotten and his incandescent lightbulb will always stand as a testament to human ingenuity, but contemporary light fixtures and lighting design allow for the use of different kinds of lightbulbs.

“The incandescent light bulb has been around since the late 1800s, but the venerable technology’s dominance seems just about over,” National Geographic reported. “On January 1, 2014, in keeping with a law passed by Congress in 2007, the old familiar tungsten-filament 40- and 60-watt incandescent light bulbs can no longer be manufactured in the U.S., because they don’t meet federal energy-efficiency standards.”

The Next Generation in Lighting

If you need to change the lightbulb in today’s contemporary light fixtures – from bath lighting to designer exterior lighting and contemporary chandeliers – you will be using a CFL lightbulb or, perhaps, an LED bulb. With either, you won’t need to change them nearly as often as you did their incandescent precursors.

“By the late 1920s and early 1930s, European researchers were doing experiments with neon tubes coated with phosphors (a material that absorbs ultraviolet light and converts the invisible light into useful white light). These findings sparked fluorescent lamp research programs in the U.S., and by the mid and late 1930s, American lighting companies were demonstrating fluorescent lights to the U.S. Navy and at the 1939 New York World’s Fair,” the Department of Energy says. “These lights lasted longer and were about three times more efficient than incandescent bulbs. The need for energy-efficient lighting American war plants led to the rapid adoption of fluorescents, and by 1951, more light in the U.S. was being produced by linear fluorescent lamps.”

The need for energy conservation continued to drive innovation. “It was another energy shortage — the 1973 oil crisis — that caused lighting engineers to develop a fluorescent bulb that could be used in residential applications,” the Department of Energy says.

In the 1970s, Edward Hammer at General Electric created the first compact fluorescent light (CFL) by bending the fluorescent tube into a spiral shape. While they were more energy efficient, until fairly recently, the price of CFLs was a deterrent to their use. Now, according to the Department of Energy, “Nearly 30 years after CFLs were first introduced on the market, an ENERGY STAR® CFL costs as little as $1.74 per bulb when purchased in a four-pack.”

For more information on fluorescent lighting and other options in designer home lighting, feel free to contact your friends at Sculpta Contemporary Lighting.

Sure, sliced bread was a wonderful innovation but, more than 150 years after it was invented, it is the image of a lightbulb that still stands as a symbol of a great new idea. It is hard to overstate the impact that electric light had on society. It is not an exaggeration to say that the incandescent lightbulb not only revolutionized interior lighting in homes and businesses across America, it revolutionized society.

The lightbulb – something that most of us take for granted – changed the way we work; the way we cook and heat our homes; the way we design buildings; the way we are entertained and so much more. It changed the way we live!

The Early History of the Lightbulb

Edison was a giant in the field of electric light, but he wasn’t the only one working to bring a lightbulb to market. “Thomas EdisonGeorge Westinghouse, and other inventors began introducing practical electric power systems in the 1880s,” The Smithsonian National Museum of American History points out.

Expanding on that idea, the Department of Energy says, “Like all great inventions, the light bulb can’t be credited to one inventor It was a series of small improvements on the ideas of previous inventors that have led to the light bulbs we use in our homes today.”

The experts at Department of Energy go on to say, “Long before Thomas Edison patented — first in 1879 and then a year later in 1880 — and began commercializing his incandescent light bulb, British inventors were demonstrating that electric light was possible with the arc lamp. In 1835, the first constant electric light was demonstrated, and for the next 40 years, scientists around the world worked on the incandescent lamp, tinkering with the filament (the part of the bulb that produces light when heated by an electrical current) and the bulb’s atmosphere (whether air is vacuumed out of the bulb or it is filled with an inert gas to prevent the filament from oxidizing and burning out). These early bulbs had extremely short lifespans, were too expensive to produce or used too much energy.”

He was one of the greatest inventors this country has ever seen, but not even Thomas Edison could have foreseen the way his simple incandescent lightbulb would someday evolve into the kind of contemporary chandeliers, decorative lighting and designer exterior lighting that we are known for here at Sculpta Lights.  You could say this particular history lesson is electrifying!

For most people in the United States, any discussion of interior lighting is in effect a discussion about decorative lighting or at the very least it’s a discussion of lighting design. Of course, that wasn’t always the case.

One hundred years ago, much of the country was still in the dark. In fact, in 1925 – less than 100 years ago – only half the homes in this country had electricity, according to the National Park Service, which runs the Thomas Edison National Historical Park in New Jersey.

Electrifying the Country

There was no power grid to plug into when Thomas Edison invented the lightbulb back in the 1870s. Edison used generators to power the interior lighting he had installed in very limited locations. Edison might have been a genius when it came to his innovation inventions, but he was a lousy businessman. It was his young assistant, an Englishman with a heavy Cockney accent named Samuel Insull, who provided the business acumen needed to lay the foundation for a profitable system of delivering electricity to American homes.

“On September 4, 1882, Edison Electric Illuminating Company of New York opened a power plant on Pearl Street in Manhattan. Six coal-fired dynamos, each weighing 27 tons, made the steam that powered a grid a mile square,” HistoryNet tells us. “Insull had been integral to persuading city officials, sometimes with bribes, to approve the project, which needed to bury 100,000 feet of wire.”

The Pearl Street Station was the beginning of a massive transformation. Soon a tapestry of privately owned municipal utility companies blanketed the country. By the 1920s, the lights were going on in most of the nation’s cities and towns from coast to coast, but American’s rural communities lagged far behind.

“Running wires into the countryside where there might be only a few people per square mile seemed uneconomical for either investors or tax-payers,” the Smithsonian Museum of American History reports. “By 1932 only about 10% of rural America was electrified, and about half of those people had to buy their own country-home power plants. This electrical divide fueled the difference in standards of living between city and farm, hampering rural Americans’ ability to participate in the life of their modernizing country.”

The Smithsonian Museum of American History says, “World War II interrupted the work of the REA [Rural Electrification Administration]. When President Roosevelt signed the Rural Electrification Bill in September 1944, Roosevelt said, ‘From the point of view of raising the living standards of rural America and providing a more efficient form of farm management, one of the most important projects interrupted by the war is the extension of rural electrification.’”

It wasn’t until the war was over that the electrification of the country was completed. So you see it is only relatively recently that people have developed an interest in decorative lighting. For most of the 20th century, the most important aspect of interior lighting was simply getting the lights turned on!

There is so much to love about the holidays, but not surprisingly here at Sculpta Lights, where our lighting designs and decorative light fixtures are inspired by contemporary sculptures and reflect cultural elements from around the globe, we are definitely partial to the glowing possibilities inherent in every single strand of holiday lights!

Can you blame us? Seriously, who doesn’t smile when the lights are plugged in on the tree? But there’s no reason to limit the use of those lovely – and affordable little lights – to the tree. Holiday lights – or fairy lights as they are now also called – can be used throughout your home during the holidays and all year long.

Lighting Design Projects with Holiday Lights

You can use the holiday lights you pick up at corner drugstore, the big box store or the home store to make a stylish and unique centerpiece for your holiday entertaining – whether the holiday you’re celebrating happens to be Christmas, Hanukah or the Fourth of July!  Just fill various glass containers with small strings of battery-operated lights. Get creative – you might have some mason jars or leftover jars from spaghetti sauce in your cupboard that would look lovely paired with a favorite vase or head to the thrift store and see what fun shapes you can find. You can also run fairy lights down the center of the table, like a runner.

The folks at Country Living rounded up some other fun DIY ideas for decorating with lights that have been freed from the tree, including:

DIY Flameless Fire Pit

Don’t have a fireplace? Add extra “warmth” to your living space by creating this adorable faux fire pit. (Roasted marshmallows not included.)

Get the tutorial at Free People

Winter Sparkle Mirror Garland & White Lights

Winter skies can get a bit dreary, so why not brighten up your rooms with some shimmer and sparkle? String together multiple strands of Christmas lights and mirror garland on a large hanging rod for a dangling decoration that endlessly glimmers.

Get the tutorial at Apartment Therapy.

For more year round interior lighting ideas as well as designer exterior lighting concepts, contact the lighting designers at Sculpta Lights.

There are two wonderful ways to brighten up a room that might feel a bit blah, whether it’s a living room, kitchen, dining room, bedroom or bath – lighting and color. Interior lighting and color can both make a statement, add focus and infuse a space with personality.

One of the most interesting colors to emerge as a popular choice in interior design has been Millennial Pink. “Millennial Pink can seem like a daunting color to incorporate in to your home but using just the right amount or pairing it with some smart color options can really let it do its thing and make a room shine,” says HouseTipster.

If you search for images of Millennial Pink, chances are you’ll see pictures of a variety of different shades of pink. “The tricky thing about Millennial Pink is that it’s also notoriously difficult to identify. While it appears some bloggers, designers, and color enthusiasts use the name Millennial Pink as a sort of catch-all for anything that roughly falls between bubblegum pink to rose quartz, Millennial Pink is its own entity, hard to classify as it may be.”

Millennial Pink Lighting

Perhaps the most intriguing thing about Millennial Pink is that it is a neutral. So, if you’re thinking it might be something Barbie would wear, think again! Millennial Pink is a sophisticated shade of pink. In searching for a definition, Shutterstock says terms like “peachy-salmon, rose gold, rose quartz, pale dogwood” can all be considered correct.

“Millennial Pink can seem like a daunting color to incorporate in to your home,” the pros at HomeTipster admit, but don’t let that stop you. The key to decorating with Millennial Pink, they say, is “using just the right amount or pairing it with some smart color options can really let it do its thing and make a room shine.”

If you want to use rose-gold contemporary light fixtures as a way to introduce Millennial Pink into your home décor, we can help.  A number of our decorative light fixtures are available with a rose gold finish that will add a subtle yet undeniably sophisticated touch. Just call us at 800-403-1790.

You’ll Need More Interior Lighting: Daylight Saving Time Ends Sunday, Nov. 3

If you’ve been wanting to update your interiors with stylish contemporary lighting, you couldn’t pick a better time than Sunday, Nov. 3, which marks the end of Daylight Saving Time. As we set the clocks back an hour, you’ll be relying even more on interior lighting to banish the darkness and fill your home with light and warmth.

Sculpta Lights, your source for designer home lighting for every room of your home, offers an exciting selection of contemporary chandeliers, table lamps, floor lamps and pendant lights.

A Nation Divided

As we get ready to bid Daylight Saving Time farewell for another year, once again, the nation is divided. Every year as the first Sunday in November approaches, some people will be happily looking forward to gaining an extra hour of sleep, while others will be bemoaning what they perceive as the impending loss of daylight hours.

According to Live Science, “Daylight saving time has a rocky past. Established in the United States in 1918, daylight saving time was a contentious matter and was repealed in 1919. The standardized clock changes, however, were re-established nationally early in World War II and observed from Feb. 9, 1942 through Sept. 30, 1945.”

Live Science goes on to say that, “After the war, U.S. states were free to choose whether to observe daylight saving time, and if they did, the calendar start dates of the time change. The result was time confusion for travelers and newscasters. In 1966, Congress enacted the Uniform Time Act, which stated that if any state observed daylight saving time, it had to follow a uniform protocol, beginning and ending on the same dates throughout the country.”

Which brings us to today. The folks who would prefer that Daylight Saving Time remain in effect permanently may be louder, but according to polls, they are in the minority.

On the Bright Side

Even while Daylight Saving Time still reigns, you may have noticed the fading light as you make your way home from work. With every day, we are moving closer and closer to the winter equinox, the shortest day of the year.  This year, the winter equinox falls on Saturday, Dec. 21.

In other words, you were going to be turning on the lights earlier anyway. Having beautiful contemporary lighting from Sculpta Lights will help you keep the darkness at bay.  Shop our full collection of designer home lighting now.