Turn Down the Lights for Sea Turtle Nesting Season

Sculpta Designer Lighting, your source for exceptional contemporary lighting, is based in Miami, Florida. Here in the Sunshine State, we are used to welcoming tourists from all around the world. But tourists aren’t the only ones who enjoy our beaches. Every year sea turtles come to our shores to lay their eggs. 

Sea turtle nesting season is just around the corner. It begins on March 1 and will last run through the end of October. Whether you have designer exterior lighting or interior lighting that shines on the beach, during nesting season, homeowners and businesses all along the Florida coast need to take steps to keep the lights down low.  

Lighting the Way for Sea Turtles

Not all sea turtles are the same. You can find seven different species living in the world’s oceans. Florida is an important nesting ground for five of those species – all of which are threatened or endangered. 

Florida’s sea turtles include:

  • Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) The most common sea turtle in Florida, the loggerhead is named for its massive, block-like head. … threatened
  • Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas) …endangered
  • Leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) … Critically Endangered
  • Kemp’s Ridley (Lepidochelys kempi) … Critically Endangered – the rarest sea turtle
  • Hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata) Critically Endangered

 

All of our sea turtles have one thing in common: the problem of light pollution from cities, towns and private homes along the coast. 

As the Sea Turtle Conservancy explains, “Nesting turtles once had no trouble finding a quiet, dark beach on which to nest, but now they must compete with tourists, businesses and coastal residents for use of sandy beaches. U.S. beaches, popular with humans and turtles alike, are now lined with seaside condominiums, houses and hotels. Lights from these developments discourage females from nesting. If a female fails to nest after multiple false crawls, she will resort to less-than-optimal nesting spots or deposit her eggs in the ocean. In either case, the survival outlook for hatchlings is slim.

“Lighting near the shore also can cause hatchlings to become disoriented and wander inland, where they often die of dehydration or predation,” the experts at the Sea Turtle Conservancy continue. “Hatchlings, scientists believe, have an innate instinct that leads them in the brightest direction, which is normally moonlight reflecting off of the ocean. Excess lighting from the nearshore buildings and streets draw hatchlings toward land, where they may be eaten, run over, or drown swimming pools.”

Efforts are being made up and down the coast of Florida to reduce light pollution during sea turtle nesting season. If you would like more information, about steps you can take to help protect endangered sea turtles, contact the Sea Turtle Conservancy.

And if you would like information about how you can adapt your designer exterior lighting or decorative interior lighting from Sculpta Lights for the upcoming sea turtle nesting season, please contact us.